AIOU Teaching Practice II Lesson Plans 6555 Physics

AIOU Teaching Practice II Lesson Plans 6555 Physics LESSON PLAN (PHYSICS)

LESSON PLAN 01                                                                                 

MAGNETS

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

Content

Key Vocabulary: attract, repel, north and south poles, predict, force field, visible, invisible

Goals and Aim

  1. Using the bar magnets, experiment putting north and south poles together, see where they attract and where they repel
  2. Predict and test which part of the magnet is the strongest : north, middle or south
  3. Study three different magnets, predict and test which is the strongest.
  4. Students will learn about Invisible/Visible force fields
  5. Students will participate in discussion
  6. Students will cooperate and work together in a group setting

Objectives

  1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of north and south poles by predicting and testing magnets
  2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of prediction
  3. Students will co-operate and work together
  4. Students will demonsrate their understanding of force fields by filling in their work sheets, and completing the activity
  5. Students will participate by answering questions, and making observations
  6. Students will demonstrate working cooperatively in groups by sharing materials

Materials

– bar magnets

– paper clips

Procedures

  1. Introduction-

Draw upon and reflect on previous knowledge of magnets from previous lessons and from previous centers they have just visited. Introduce opposites and like sides and how they relate to magnets.

This center will focus on looking at the invisible force field that magnets have around them. You can feel the force when you hold a steel object close to a magnet and try to pull it away. The force becomes weaker when you hold the object further away.

  1. Development-

Have the students divide into two groups, one group will work on attraction and repelling activity, the other group will work on the magnet strength activity. Have the groups switch once they are each complete.

In the small group, demonstrate how magnets pull together. Have the students pass around magnets so they can feel and understand the pull for themselves.

  1. Practice-

Have the students make predictions as a group before they start the activity.

Demonstrate how each activity is done before they begin.

As a group, their will be a demonstration of putting two magnets a little bit apart underneath a white piece of paper. Then add iron filings on top so the students can observe how the magnets will pull together, and the iron filings will show the force field. this experiment makes the invisible force field become visible to the students.

  1. Independent Practice-

Students will complete each activity and fill in the sections of their worksheet that correspond to the activity

Students will also write and reflect something new they learned in their magnet journals

Students will be able to try putting the iron filings on the paper to observe the force field for themselves.
They will then fill out the corresponding worksheet, and write what they have learned in their magnet journals.

  1. Checking for understanding-

Have a group discussion based on their results and predictions of each activity. Check the students work sheets to see that they have filled out all the information. Check to see each student has written in their magnet journals

  1. Closure-

Discuss as a group what new things they learned about magnets before they move on to the next center.

Discuss as a group what new things they have learned about magnets, both at this magnet center and from previous lessons

Evaluation-

Check each students worksheets for accuracy, and check the students journals to see their progress and to check to see that they have a grasp on the concepts.

Check each students work sheets to see that they are completed and are accurate and check their journals to see that they are reflecting on what they have learned, and that they understand the concepts.

Reflection-

As a teacher I needed to control the noise level and disturbances from students better. Some of the magnets broke from a result of students not using the magnets appropriately, next time I should monitor the students and make sure they know how to use the magnets appropriately so this does not happen. Also when I first ran this station I did not explain the activities before separating them into groups which caused confusion, I fixed this for the next group. Overall the station ran smoothly and the students seemed to enjoy both activities.

This center was more group focused, and all the students were together cooperatively and participated in discussion.

Overall, the students seemed to enjoy this magnet center, and seemed to take away the main concepts..

 

LESSON PLAN 02                                                                                 

MOTION, FORCES AND ENERGY, GRAVITY AND WEIGHT

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Energy charge in matter, conductors, and insulators. Thermodynamics – Heat Transfer

positive, negative, and neutrally charged particles: ( protons,electrons, and neutrons.) A good conductor and a bad conductor.

Objects move when they change position.

Understanding Distance, Speed, and Time Relationships

Vocabulary: Distance vs. Time Graph

Vocabulary:
Frame of Reference

Motion
Distance
Speed
Constant Speed

Average Speed

Force
Friction
Mass and Force

Calculating Acceleration Due to gravity

Weight
Gravity
Inertia

In this section the basic idea of motion is explored. This section characterizes motions in to four basic types: translational, circular, projectile, and rotational. Also, a key point is to understand motion diagrams and be able to make them. These diagrams are the beginning foundation understanding motion. The graph is a display of the displacement of an object at constant time interval. Then in section two we transfer the motion diagram to a particle model. These are exactly the same graphs, but the object is now represented in a simpler form of a particle. In the third section we translate the particle diagram to a position versus time graph. On the x-axis we have displacement of the car in meters or another SI Unit. In the y-axis we have time which is show in seconds. In section four we then transfer the position-time graph to a velocity-time graph. To form the velocity time graph you determine the slope of the line in the position-time graph. This is done by (R2-R1)/(T2-T1)= velocity (meters/seconds).

Goals and Aim

  1. Students will increase their understanding of how an object moves from a level of not knowing to a level of understanding the vocabulary.
  2. Students will increase their understanding of how an object gains speed from a level of not knowing to a level of understanding.
  3. Understanding aspects of Motion
  4. Relating the principles of MOTION to everyday life with relative connections.
  5. To work out Force due to Gravity
  6. To Know the difference between weight and mass.

Objectives

1.Discuss how forces: gravity and friction cause acceleration.

2.Define vocabulary.

3. Utilize technology to enhance learning.

4. Find out how to calculate speed.

5. Identify and describe situations with constant rates of change and compare them

6. Make and test predictions about step sizes and finish times.

Materials

Projector
Notes Handout

DVD from Book “Lesson 1 Motion, Forces and Energy”, Smart Board, and United Streaming clips

Procedures

  1. Introduction-

To introduce this activity, ask two student volunteers to stand in front of the classroom to physically demonstrate and discuss the results of each of the following scenarios:

  1. Scenario #1: Two students start from the same position at one end of the classroom. One student takes giant-steps while the other takes baby-steps. Each student takes one step per second. Who gets to the other end of the classroom first? How many steps are taken? Discuss the results.
  2. Scenario #2. One student starts behind the other at the same end of the classroom, both walking with equal stride and pace. Each student takes one step per second. Who gets to the other end of the classroom first? How many steps does each student take? Discuss the results. Ask students to predict the effect of changing the length of stride.
  3. Instruct students that they will use Gizmos to learn about the relationship between distance and time.

1.DVD Ch. 12 Lesson 1 Motion, Forces and Energy

2.Write Vocabulary for Lesson 1

3.Discovery Education clips on forces, motion and energy

  1. In their notebooks, try their best to explain their walk from their last class to my class.

5.Share/Post on board

Weight and Force:

  1. Why does everything fall down and what is mass?
  2. What is gravity?
  3. How much do you weigh? (force)
  4. Development-
  5. Distribute Gizmo handout to each group of students
  6. Tell students that they will take turns using Gizmos.
  7. Students will work in groups of two. One will be the mouse driver and the other the reader/recorder for the group.
  8. The “Mouse Driver” controls the action of the mouse and movement on the computer screen.
  9. The “Reader/Recorder” will read the directions from the activity sheet and record observations while guiding the activity.
  10. Partners should switch roles until all have moved the runner.

Part 2:

  1. Demonstrate how to measure the speed of a marble.
  2. Video game connections
  3. Airplane connections

Part 3:

MASS!!!!
1. All objects have mass.

What is mass?

what is it measured in?

FORCE!!!!
2. Changes motion.

Size of acceleration depends on size of force.

Doubling force does what to acceleration

Doubling mass does what to acceleration.

Show equation force = mass x acceleration (f = ma), say what each is measured in.

GRAVITY!!!!
3. Change in weight due to gravity acceleration. Gravity is attractive. The bigger the mass stronger attraction.
Earth is big enough to notice gravity (falling) Weight is the force from f = ma where a is the acceleration due to gravity.

  1. Practice-
  2. Students will measure the speed of a marble by measuring the speed of a marble 10 times.
    2. Allow students to explore the Gizmo by moving and pressing any buttons.
    3. Begin the lesson with the Gizmo Warm-up Activity
    4. Give examples using f = ma, changing all three concepts
  3. Independent Practice-
  4. Students will take notes on vocabulary.
    2. Students will write a paragraph on coyote comparing how energy is like him.
    3. Activity A- Learning about the runner’s position
    4. Activity B – Learning about the runner’s direction and speed
    5. Activity C – Learning about how to use two runners and two graphs
  5. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-
  6. Students who need visual accommodations will sit in the front.
    2. Students with learning disabilities will have text book high lighted and shortened assignments.
    3. Classic note taking
    4. Descriptions through illustrations on the board
    5. Video clip
  7. Checking for understanding-
  8. Discuss Vocabulary
    2. Quiz on the clips
    3. Discuss results of calculating marble speeds.
    4. Active and fluid discussion in “their own words” regarding what was taught.
    5. Questions or tasks that encourage students to reflect on their work
    6. Worksheet questions and answers.
  9. Closure-
  10. Tell a Native American tale of how coyote changes forms as he wishes in order to be another animal as a trickster. Students will relate the coyote to energy.
    2. Ask students what was learned in class
    3. Students reflect on their work

Evaluation-

  1. Quiz on Discovery Education clips.
    2.Paragraph rubric.
    3.How were students able to use Gizmo
    4. What problems were encountered

 

LESSON PLAN 03                                                                                 

ACCELERATION

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Topic:  How do you find the acceleration of a moving object using velocity and time as well as force and mass?
Content:  Calculating acceleration using two different formulas. 1st. acceleration = change in speed divided by the time. 2nd acceleration = force divided by the mass. Key Vocabulary Words are: force, Newton’s first law, inertia, newton, net force, acceleration, deceleration, Newton’s second law.
Goals:  Student should know the difference between Newton’s first law and second law. Student should know how to calculate the veloscity of an object by distance divided by the time. Student should know how to calculate acceleration by using velocity and time. Student should know how to calculate acceleration by using force and mass. Student should know how to convert distances from the metric system to the English system. Student should know how to use apparatus (car, track, timer, and photogate) to calculate acceleration problems. Student should know how to create a graph from a data table and interpret the results.
Objectives:  Student will be able to calculate acceleration using force and mass. Student will be able to calculate acceleration using veloscity and time. Student will be able to set up apparatus to conduct experiments on acceleration. Student will be able to convert kilometers to miles and vice versa. Student will be able to convert meters per hour to meters per second. Student will be able to graph data gathered during the experiment. Student will be able to create a data table. Student will be able to analyze and interpret data. Student will be able to calculate the net force on an object. Students will be able to use the acceleration formula to solve for time or final velocity. Student will be able to use the acceleration formula to solve for force and mass.
Materials:  SMART Board Technology, Laptop, CPO apparatus (timer, photogate, track, cars, weights), scientist notebook, graphing paper.
Introduction:  Students will start the unit by reading the text in class along with the students. The text will be put on the SMART Board so that it can be dissected using the SQ3R strategy. Students will break down material into three categories (survey, question, read, recall, review).
Development:  Students will work out problems on the SMART Board in front of the class with the help of the teacher to show and learn now to do problems. The problems will come from the math skill builder CD. Students will work in their assigned groups to complete laboratory experiments utilizing the first and second laws of physics and the formulas that pertain to those laws.
Practice:  Students will try to do problems on the SMART Board with help form the instructor. The instructor will go over areas of difficulty with the students asking them to not only write the answer to the problem but to write out how they arrived at that answer so that I may see where their difficiencies lie. Student will look at laboratory problems and make flow chart about how they will conduct the experiment on poster board to help them visualize what they will be doing the day before they so an experiment.
Accommodations:  I will give students calculators to use to help them solve math problems. I will use SQ3R to help those students who have trouble reading an getting out the core information. I will also have the students make index cards with the questions they create from SQ3R on one side and the answer on the other. They will use them as flash cards to help them retain the information in the reading.
Checking For Understanding:  They will have to do a hands on laboratory experiment that will entail that they use the proper formula to solve the problem given. They will be given a quiz on whether they understand the math formulas solving for various situations via. (final velocity, acceleration, mass, force, and time). They will be given an examination where they will be asked to answer vocabulary related questions and solve math equations for the Newton’s first and second laws.
Closure:  The goal of student assessment is not merely to measure student performance but to improve it.
Evaluation:  This will be looked at afer each part of the lesson.
Teacher Reflections:  This will be completed at the end of the project

 

LESSON PLAN 04                                                                                 

PARTICLE COLLISION, FOUCAULT PENDULUM AND THE CORIOLIS EFFECT

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Light speed.
Hydrogen and oxygen
electromagnetism

Presentation, exercises and report on subjects

Goals and Aim

  1. Students will know light speed
    2. They will know what H and O2 is
    3. The students will understand electomagnetism
    4. Inform about subjects
    5. Achieve greater understanding of the Earth’s movement and how it effects us
    6. Inform about practical uses of these theories

Objectives

  1. Explain light speed and its significance
    2. Explain H and O2
    3. Explain electromagnetism
    4. A good grade in Physics
    5. Give a clear and interesting presentation
    6. Be concise and professional during the lesson

Materials

Beamer, laptop, handouts, blackboard

Procedures

  1. Introduction-

1.This is light speed-299 792 458 m / s
2. H= hydrogen and O2 is 2 parts hydrogen or water
3.energy through magnetic and electric energy
4. How does Earth rotate?
5. What is the Coriolis Effect and how can you experience it?
6. Any formulas adjacent to it

  1. Development-
  2. Draw on the board what each is
    2. Introducing the concept of the Foucault Pendulum and Foucault himself
    3. Short video of the pendulum and the Earth moving together
    4. Diagrams and formulas for both concepts
  3. Practice-
  4. Have the students discuss pros and cons of theory
    2. Explanation of practical uses of the Coriolis Effect and Foucault’s pendulum
    3. Simple, logical examples of exercises
  5. Independent Practice-
  6. Have the students write down thoughts
    2. Have the students draw a model particle collider
    3. More individual exercises (not many, maybe just 2-3, but enough to test if anybody actually paid attention)
  7. Closure-
  8. Assign home work for the students to research particle collision.
    2. Conclusion: what they must remember from the lesson
    3. Thank students for participation

 

LESSON PLAN 05                                                                                 

ROTATIONAL MOTION AND VECTORS

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

 

Content

In this lesson students will learn the basics about vectors, how to compute the coordinates of vectors, and how to add vectors. Students will create their own area problems involving vector addition and solve them.
Vocabulary:
Vector
Scalar
Magnitude
Displacement
Line Segment
Resultan
tCentripetal Force
Angular Momentum Conservation
Precession

Goals and Aim

  1. Students will understand the physical components and differences of vectors and scalars
    2. Students will be able to graph and compute physics problems and components into vector representation.
    3. Studentswill understand that if you apply force to an object perpendicular to the direction of its motion causes the object, the object will change directions; but not necessarily speed.
    4. Students can explain that circular motion requires repeated or constant force focused towards the dcenter of the circle.
    5. Students can calculate centripetal acceleration using the following equation: a = v2 / r.

Objectives

1.Students will use equations and calculators to determine the tension in a swinging pendulum
2. Students will listen to and discuss Angular momentum concepts presented to them
3. Students will apply conservation of angular momentum to examples of rotating objects.
4. Students will use graphs to understand vector components.
5. Students will use graphs to understand the resultant of multiple vectors.

Materials

Laptop with YouTube access
Projector
Calculators
YouTube for video
Graphing Paper
Colored Pencils
Rulers

Procedures

  1. Introduction-
  2. Students watch YouTube video of Steve Trotter pendulum swing stunt.
  3. Development-
  4. Students copy the picture down in their notes and record given parameters.
    2. Teacher presents definitions of Angular momentum and conservation law.
    3. Teacher demonstrates examples of angular momentum and precession
  5. Practice-
  6. Students Calculate tension support required by the cable.
    2. Student discuss why the stunt failed.
    3. Students predict what will happen with each angular momentum demonstration.
  7. Independent Practice-
  8. Students will complete a problem from their homework at end of class.
  9. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-
  10. Material is presented on the overhead and is posted online for their review outside of class.
  11. Checking for understanding-
  12. Students will share out answers to angular momentum demonstrations.
  13. Closure-
  14. Students complete problems from the textbook.

Evaluation-

  1. Students will be able to complete problem set from textbook.

 

LESSON PLAN 06                                                                                 

SOUND VIBRATIONS AND RESONANCE

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Vocabulary Words:

Sound, Vibrations, Frequency, Pitch, Tension, Volume, Amplitude, Frequency, Wavelength, Pitch, Vibration, Resonance, Longitudinal

Goals and Aim

  1. Learn ow tension affects pitch.
    2. Learn how instruments use tension to create pitch.
    3. Learn how to manipulate pitch using tension.
    4. The learner will conduct investigations and use appropriate technology to build an understanding of the concepts of sound.

Objectives

  1. To introduce the idea of Resonance
    2. To control a class for a demonstration/ half a lesson
    3. Students will learn to explain the dynamics of the pitch of a sound and its rate of vibration from the source. They will also factor how that affects pitch.

Materials

Science materials from Good Vibrations Unit kits, document camera, Balloons, CD player with a variety of music, Soundbox with sub, strobe, amp, frequency generator, stemmed glass, ping pong balls

Procedures

  1. Introduction-
  2. 5 min. On doc camera, write the definition of Pitch, Frequency, Kalimba, Xylophone, and Tension for students to copy in notebooks.
    2. 2 min. On doc camera, display pre-observation inquiries asking about the factors of pitch and facilitate class discussion.
    3. 1 min. Have 2 students pull on 1 student standing in middle= TENSION= force of pull on opposite sides
    4. Students will be able to see vibrations using a balloon.

Whiteboards. Questions to recall knowledge about sound.
Draw a wave. Label it’s amplitude and wavelength.

  1. Development-
  2. 1 min. Show equipment.
    2. 3 min. Explain how to set up/use equipment.
    3. Choose STARTER for each group. Role is to ensure everyone gets to try equipment.
    4. 1 min. Introduce 2 student observation sheets and distribute.
    5. I distribute one miniactivity. 10-15 min later, I distribute the second.

Give each student a balloon. Play different music so the students can feel the vibrations using the balloon. Questions students as to who can feel the vibrations and how well. Try different volumes and see if that makes a difference for the children. Ask them to draw a conclusion about vibrations and volume.

Version 2: Begin with questions, ‘How are sounds made?’ If unsure, get the pupils to hum and ask what they feel. Vibrations is the key answer ‘What mediums can sound travel through?’
Begin demonstration of singing stemmed glass explaining things can vibrate. Explain you can see these vibrations. Set up the experiment with a strobe. Tune into the resonant frequency at 641Hz. Show the the class the slow motion vibrations explaining that this is the key frequency, the ‘resonant’ frequency. Increase/decrease the frequency to show it’s peak frequency. Show how amplitude affects it. Make the glass break.

  1. Practice-
  2. 10-15 min. STARTERS start miniactivities. RECORD observations on appropriate observation sheet.
    2. 10-15 min. I distribute second miniactivity equipment. They RECORD observation on second observation sheet.
    3. End. Return to desks. Share observations/ pose processing questions.

Allow the children to move around the room while the music is playing to feel the different vibrations. They can also talk to the balloons and feel the vibrations in the balloons.

Version 2:

Allow pupils to have a go at making the stemmed glass sing.

  1. Independent Practice-
  2. Distribute STUDENT RESPONSE SHEET for individual homework.
    2.Have students write a summary of their observations.
  3. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-
  4. Accelerated Learners: Students draw original instrument that makes high pitch or low pitch. An instrument that does not yet exist. Label/write factors that affect the pitch.
    2. Sight Impaired: Verbal presentation/ explanations, provide manipulative tools to touch.
    3. Hearing Impaired: Doc camera projection, provide written handouts
    4. Learning Disability: I walk about & support students struggling, students receive extra support from working in groups.
    5. Students who have a more difficult time writing can illustrate or write less. Students who want a challenge: Did the vibrations feel any different when the pitch changed?
  5. Checking for understanding-
  6. I’m using the STUDENT RESPONSE SHEET as homework.
    2. I can use inquiries for academic feedback to check for understanding at the intro of the following Science lesson.
    3. Students will share summaries with partners, then share with class.
  7. Closure-
  8. Students place observations in blue folders and clear desk.
    2. Allow time to ask questions about the homework.
    3. Students will use mix pair share to tell what they learned about vibrations and volume.

Evaluation-

  1. Measure of behavior (How many disruptions)
    2. How interested
    3. Were there many questions?
    4. How successful was the plenary? (Could they answer the questions easily)
    5. Evaluation will be teacher observation and teacher reading students’ summaries.

Reflection-

Version 1 and 2 of the lesson went well with different class. I feel that version 2 of the lesson is more for a very hands on group of students. Version 1 is more for your cerebral student groups.

 

LESSON PLAN 07                                                                                 

THE CHARACTERISTICS OF ELECTRICITY

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Static Electricity
Static, Electricity, Atom, Electron, Proton, Neutron, imbalance, induce, attract, repel
Emphasis on ESL/ELD/Special need students

Goals and Aim

Students will be able to:
1. Explain what causes static electricity
2. Describe the action between charges

Objectives

Students will be able to:
1. Explain what causes static electricity
2. Describe the action between charges

Materials

Plastic objects, Styrofoam, bits of paper, balloons, sticky notes, markers, electroscope

Procedures

  1. Introduction-
  2. Static electricity in nature
    2. Conditions that favour static
    3. Atomic theory: Protons [+], Elelctrons [-], neutrons [no charge]
  3. Development-
  4. Atomic theory:
    – electrons in motion
    – how objects are charged statically
    – why some objects cannot be charged
    2. Charging by contact & induction
    3. Demonstrate:
    – Like charges repel
    – Unlike charges attract
    Using Balloons, electroscope, plastic pen and sweater
  5. Practice-

1.Role play as charged particles [ electrons moving like bees around the hive]
2. action between charges – attraction and repulsion.

  1. Independent Practice-
  2. Reading comprehension
    2. charging by contact and by induction
  3. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-
  4. Focus on new words
    2. Using the words in a sentence
    3. Reading / writing and Math
  5. Checking for understanding-
  6. Did the student follow directions?
    2. Did the student participate in activities?
    3. To what extent was the participation?
    4. Did they record their observations and results in their journals.
    Rubric
    4=followed directions,active participation, recorded all information requested. 3=followed directions, some participation, recorded most of the information requested.
    2=followed most of the directions, little participation, recorded some information.
    1=followed some directions, very little participation, recorded little information.
    0=nothing done.
  7. Closure-

1.Is Static a good / bad
2. Are there any uses?
3. Do you have any questions

 

LESSON PLAN 08                                                                                 

THERMODYNAMICS – HEAT TRANSFER

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Energy charge in matter, conductors, and insulators. Thermodynamics – Heat Transfer

positive, negative, and neutrally charged particles: ( protons,electrons, and neutrons.) A good conductor and a bad conductor.

Goals and Aim

  1. Teach my class the differently charged particle terms and meanings.
    2. Teach my class that all substances can be arranged to conduct electric charge.
    3. Teach the difference between conductors and insulators.
    4. Students should be able to know how the ice cream was made by the transfer of heat.
    5. Students should know the definition of heat transfer and how it was appiled to the activity.
    6. Students should be able to evaluate there results and why making the ice cream worked and why it didn’t (if that was the result).

Objectives

  1. Ask class if they know the different types of electric charge and the terms. Also, ask if they know what the differnce is between a conductor and an insulator is.
    2. Demonstrate a lesson on the powerpoint slides
    3. Hand out a work sheet, then quiz, then homework to each student.
    4. To teach the students about heat transfer.
    2. To help students to understand a part of physics in a simple and easy way.

Materials

Power point presentation, worksheet, quiz, and homework sheet with correct answer keys.

For Demo:

  1. Sandwich and gallon baggies
    2. 1/2 cup of milk
    3. 1 tbsp of sugar
    4. 1 tsp of vanilla extract
    5. 6 tbsp of salt
    6. 2 cups of ice (about to tray full)
    7. Plastic cups
    8. Spoons
    9. Green food coloring

Procedures

  1. Introduction-

1.Electric charge (protons, neutrons, and electrons.)
2.Like charges attract opposite charges repel.
3.The difference between a Conductor and an Insulator.

  1. Development-

1.Power point presentation slides which vary.
2.Provide the class with valid explanations on why and how this topic occurs in everyday life.

  1. Practice-

1.Hand out worksheet.

  1. Independent Practice-

1.Hand out home work.

  1. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-

1.Give a pop quiz on everything i taught during the class.

  1. Checking for understanding-

1.Go over the pop quiz providing help with any questions the students got wrong and giving them the correct answers.

  1. Closure-

1.End with a conclusion on the topic while introducing to them what the next topic has to do with.

Evaluation-

1.Make a mean score of the classes quiz grade.
2. Students will answer a question at the end of the activity to explain what happened and what they learned.

Reflection-

See what needs to be more closely concentraded on during the next lesson.

 

LESSON PLAN 09                                                                                 

WAVES AND WAVELIKE MOTION

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Content

Students will utilize props to demonstrate the different types of waves and wave motion, as well as the specific properties of waves.
Vocabulary:
-Wave
-Transverse/Light Wave
-Longitudinal/Sound Waves
Light Waves
Sound Waves
Energy

Goals and Aim

1.To Show that sound waves have energy.
2.To Show that light waves have energy.
3.That light and sound wave change with different materials.
4. Understand what a wave is.
5. Be able to distinguish between a transverse and longitudinal wave.
6. Understand how waves travel.
7. To review the two types of waves above.
8.To teach the natural effects of these waves

Objectives

Be able to demonstrate the understanding and evaluate evidence of how light, sound and other waves have energy. Students will also be able to explain how these sources can and do interact with different materials.

1.To emphasize the difference of the nature of the waves.
2.To familiarize the children with the theoretical and realistic aspects of the waves

Materials

White boards, markers, hex nut, balloon, index card, rubber band, foam pieces, string,craft sticks, scissors, laser, glow sticks, Textbook,Dry-erase board,and poster-size photo visuals.

Procedures

  1. Introduction-

1.Review of key terms of light and sound waves
2.Share ideas with partners.
3. Will beginning by reviewing the two types of waves learned last lesson.

  1. Development-

1.Use Question and Answer to retrieve information from students.
2.Create Notes to review from the Q and A.
3.Teach new lesson off of last lessons notes.
4.Show sound waves in a balloon with hex nut and then with penny.

  1. Practice-

1.Make Noise creating buzzer – show example
2. Have the children read from book and discuss what the information means to them.
3. Dicuss any questions that arise for the benefit of all.

  1. Independent Practice-
  2. With partner,make own noise buzzer
  3. Accommodations (Differentiated Instruction)-

1.Some students kits will already be partially assembled.
2.Some students will not have to write out the response questions. They will have to answer yes or no.

  1. Checking for understanding-

1.On sticky notes have them write what sound waves are.
2. Asks various students to model thier thinking as to how they arrived at the differences of displayed wave visuals.
3. Prepare for test by giving students worksheets that cover the material on the test.
4. Use test as assessment in the following lesson.

  1. Closure-
  2. Introduce Light waves, turn out lights and have them break glow sticks.
    2. Shine laser
    3 1.Study and review notes
    4. Do not allow yourself to get confused.Use my notes and the textbook for guidance.

Evaluation-

  1. Introduce Light waves, turn out lights and have them break glow sticks.
    2. Shine laser
    3 1.Study and review notes
    4. Do not allow yourself to get confused.Use my notes and the textbook for guidance.

Reflection-

I Think that the children learn better with visuals, so I use them a lot. I get much feedback reporting that that image you drew really helped. I think that all the children will be able to master the upcoming test with my lecture notes, visuals, assigned study pages, and the refreshment of today.

 

LESSON PLAN 10                                                                                 

THE PENDULUM

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Objectives:
To introduce the concept of vibratory and periodic motion and relate it to the movement of a pendulum.  To discover that the period of a pendulum is dependent on the length of the pendulum and independent of the bob and the amplitude.

Materials needed:

Each group needs a stop watch and pendulum with a different bob. Materials for pendulum string bob – infant stacking rings provide colorful bobs of different sizes and mass right angle clamp ringstand rod For class graphs – two pieces of end roll paper approximately 21/2 meters long, a meter stick, markers and masking tape
Strategy:
Begin the class period with a discussion of what the students think periodic motion is.  After a few minutes, bring out a pendulum from behind the lab table and use it as an example of periodic motion.  Point out its various parts – bob, length, pivot point.  Demonstrate what is meant by period and amplitude.  Spend a few minutes discussing the accuracy of measuring a single period.  The students should realize that timing how long it takes for ten cycles and dividing by 10 will lessen the effects of reaction time and result in a more accurate measurement of the period. Break up the class into groups.  Each group is given a pendulum with a different bob but all pendulums are 1 meter in length.  (A different option would be to have the students construct their own pendulums 1 meter in length.  If doing so,make sure to discuss that the length of the pendulum is measured from the pivot
point to the center of gravity of the pendulum bob.)  Each group is to find the period of their pendulum by timing it for 10 cycles and using an amplitude of 10 cm.  After doing so, they are to experiment with other amplitudes (5 cm, 15 cm, 20 cm, etc.) to determine if the amplitude effects the period.  All groups record their data in the class data table on the board under the following headings: Color of bob, Time for 10 cycles, Period, Effect of changing the amplitude. When all groups have recorded their data, call the class together for a discussion of the results.  It should be apparent that the shape and mass of the bob and the amplitude have no effect on the period.  Small differences can be explained by experimental error.  If the students are not sure that the rings are actually different masses, bring out a scale and prove it.  If you are using infant stacking rings, there will be about a 50% difference between the largest and smallest ring’s mass. Each group is given a different length of string to create a new pendulum. Lengths should vary from 25 cm to 2 m.  As before the groups will find the period of their pendulum.  This time they will graph their results on a length versus period graph. While the students are finding the period of their pendulums, hang a piece of end roll paper about 21/2 meters long on a wall and label the axes.  The vertical axis is marked off to the actual length of the pendulum.  The horizontal axis is the period marked in a convenient scale. When the students have found the period of their pendulum they should remove it from its support bar and hang it on the graph at its corresponding period.  Remind the students that the actual length of the pendulum is measured from the pivot to the center of gravity of the bob.  When using rings for bobs, the center of gravity is at the center of the ring, therefore it is important that the centers of the rings be lined up on the horizontal axis.  By using this self graphing technique, it is not necessary for the students to measure the pendulum’s length and the effect of the length of the pendulum on the period is shown quite dramatically. Once all groups have added their pendulums to the graph discuss the results.  The graph should look like a y-parabola.  If it is not obvious that it is a parabola remember that the origin is a point on the graph – zero length will havezero period.  With a marker sketch the curve on the graph.  Discuss with the students the shape of the graph and what it represents mathematically.  Hopefully they will come up with the idea that there is a direct relationship between the length and the square of the period.  (This depends on their level of math ability.)  If this relationship is not obvious, lead the students by a discussion of what needs to be done to straighten out the graph.  This approach usually gets to the idea of squaring the period.  The students should now verify these predictions by squaring their period and regraphing on the second end roll graph.  The students should transfer their pendulums from the first to the second graph.  The resulting graph should be a straight line through the origin.  At this point the class can discuss the results that the square of the period is directly proportional to the length of the pendulum.  This would be a good point to start a discussion of the equation and theory of a pendulum.

Conclusion:

This activity will take more than the usual lab period.  A good breaking point would be after finding the effect of the bob and the amplitude.  This activity can be used with elementary students up to the first graph.
Evaluation:

The student’s understanding of this material can be evaluated by having them use the graph to predict what the period of a pendulum will be for a specific length.  They can then experimentally verify their prediction.

 

LESSON PLAN 11                                                                                 

DISTANCE VS. DISPLACEMENT

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Topic:  Distance vs. Displacement
Content:  Time Distance Displacement Pythagoras’s theorem scalar quantity vector quantity
Goals:  -The students will be able to define what distance and displacement is and define which quantity is a vector and which one is a scalar. -The students will be able to identify the units for distance, displacement, and time. -The students will be able to measure the distance and elapsed time intervals for a variety of objects. -The students will be able to explain the difference between calculating an objects distance and calculating an objects displacement using simple mathematical formulas
Objectives:  
Materials:  chalk board, chalk, handout on distance vs. displacement
Introduction:  Imagine that you won tickets to a concert in Florida and you can bring two of your best friends. The free tickets come with airfare, but when all three of you go to the airport, they have lost one of your tickets!! One of your friends suggest that they will drive down from New York to Florida to meet you for the concert. My question, if your friend drives at the same speed as the train, who will make it there first and why?
Development:  The teacher will have the students discuss the introduction question and come up with an answer. the teacher will then define both distance and displacement and cite different examples to them (ex. person running a full lap around a track, distance is different than displacement). The teacher will also show on the board examples of ways to calculate displacement using Pythagoras’s Theorem.
Practice:  The students will get two handouts from the teacher. One the teacher will go over with them as a class defining both terms and solving problems. The second handout will be done in their lab groups as their independent practice
Accommodations:  
Checking For Understanding:  The teacher will assess how the students are working in groups and will grade the worksheets that they worked on in their individual groups.
Closure:  At the end of the class the teacher will have index cards passed to the students and they must write out one problem for the class to solve regarding distance and displacement. These will be used as a do now for the following class
Evaluation:  The teacher will grade the handout that was worked on in their lab groups. The teacher will also grade daily participation in the class discussion as well as group work.

 

LESSON PLAN 12                                                                                 

MAGNETS & MAGNETIC FIELDS

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Topic:  Magnets, Electromagnets, and Motors
Content:  magnetic Poles, magnetic fields, forces exerted on objects by magnetic fields, relationship to electricity
Goals:  Have all students involved in hands on activities using magnets. Involve all students in discussion of properties of magnets and magnetic fields.
Objectives:  1. Students will understand the general properties of magnets. 2. Students will understand and make an electromagnet. 3. Students will use electromagnets to do work, and they will make an electric motor.
Materials:  Magnets, iron filings, nails, pop cans, magnet holder, overhead
Introduction:  Stand up several nails “floating nails” on table top. Discuss what is happening and what forces a re in action. Use materials in spece between naisl and magnet.
Development:  Each student is given two magnets and is told to take them home and explore the properties of magnets, making as many observations as he/she can. The guide sheet below might be helpful to direct them. MAGNETIC PROPERTIES: An Attractive Assignment 1. Do the magnets attract all objects? 2. List 10 objects that are affected by the magnets. Do they have anything in common? 3. List 10 objects upon which the magnet has no effect? Do these objects have anything in common? 4. What might affect the ability of a magnet to attract another object? List as many factors as you can. 5. Is there a limit to the number of things that can be attracted to the magnet at one time? Test this. 6. Try and locate magnets in your house. Do these magnet show the same qualities as the ones above? DON’T FORGET TO BRING YOUR MAGNETS BACK TO CLASS!!!
Practice:  “A Magnetic Discussion” 1. List the following on the overhead for students to answer while you check their homework. MAGNETIC OR NOT (Don’t list answers, just items) REFRIGERATOR DOOR **YES**Students are familiar with this. SOFA **NO** Students may argue a sleeper sofa has metal, but most textiles, wood, and foam insulation are not magnetic. COKE CAN (OR 7UP) **YES**These are made of steel. PEPSI CAN **NO** These are made of aluminum. DOLLAR BILL **YES**The ink has a little bit of iron in it, so that pop and candy machines can tell if its the real thing and not a photocopy. CEREAL **NO** HOWEVER, cereals claim to be iron fortified, and in some cereals, if a magnet is dropped into the box, it can be recovered from the bottom of the box with iron filings stuck to it. Iron fortified?? 2. Go over the above list and include in your discussion student observations of things that were magnetic in their home. Give as many students as possible a chance to answer. Lead into the properties of magnets…”Let’s organize all this information.”
Accommodations:  Have students interact with different materials and magnets to visualize in real time the concepts.
Checking For Understanding:  Question: You are stranded on a desert island and have been captured by some potentially hostile natives. All you have in you pocket are four fairly strong magnets and some string. You must “wow” the natives in two different ways to save your life, what will you do?
Closure:  Today, magnets are used in generators that supply electricity, motors, television sets,tape recorders etc. Your intercation with magnetic fieds and electricity makes the world we live in operate.
Evaluation:  
Teacher Reflections:  

 

LESSON PLAN 13                                                                                 

METRIC SYSTEM CONVERSIONS

Class: 9

Subject: Physics

 

Teacher Name:

Topic:  Metric System Conversions
Content:  Learning how to convert metric measurements within the Metric System Vocabulary: conversion, units, meter, gram, liter, metric system of measurement, standards, deci, deca, milli, hecto, kilo, centi
Goals:  For students to be able to convert metric measurements within the Metric System
Objectives:  Students will be able to convert metric measurements within the Metric System. Students will be able to use the “stairstep” and convert metric units by using the metric prefixes correctly. Students will be able to move the decimal to its correct position in coverting metric measurements.
Materials:  Chalkboard, textbook, class notes, calculator, help sheets, pencil, and paper
Introduction:  Students will be reminded of the purpose of a universal measuring system. Teacher will also review material previously taught as part of this unit of study: importance of standards in measurement and the numerical values of prefixes used within the metric system
Development:  Teacher will lecture as well as demonstrate on the board the mathematical significance of decimals holding place value. The teacher will demonstrate the proper use of the “stairsteps” in determining conversion values.
Practice:  Students will be given two days of actual guided practice. Those days will consist of a practical application lab where they are measuring objects, determining English equivalents of meter, centimeter, gram, etc., and this day of solving problems with teacher/peer assistance.
Accommodations:  Students with IEPs will be allowed to use the “stairstep” sheet during all problem-solving, i.e. guided practice, homework, quiz, and test. General education students will be expected to learn “stairstep” and be able to apply its use on all individual work. Visually impaired students will have preferential seating during lecture. Exceptionally proficient students will research extreme values of metric measurements such as a nanoliter.
Checking For Understanding:  At the end of this unit, grades will be recorded for notes in notebook, application lab, homework, guided practice, quiz, and test.
Closure:  Since students must learn this process for future science classes such as chemistry and physics, this concept will be reviewed many times throughout the year.
Evaluation:  All students will be given the same test since all students will be expected to be proficient on the state-mandated tests. However, the IEP students will be allowed to use the “stairstep” and class notes, if needed. All students will be allowed to use a calculator.
Teacher Reflections:  There are many mathematical concepts for some of the IEP students to grasp. They must always be able to use their “stairstep” help sheet when doing metric conversion. I will also research a metric conversion “calculator” for some of my students.

AIOU Teaching Practice II Lesson Plans 6555 Chemistry

 

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